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Uncle Markie out and about.

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Sat
21
Aug '10

Frankfurt To Berlin

Today is a big travel day – the ICE (high-speed train) leaves at 12:13 for a 16:21 (that’s 4:21pm for those non-military types).

Can someone explain this statue that is on the top of the train station?

I understand, sort of, the Atlas one….

And in case you are wondering what an ICE (inter-city express) look like, here is one, though not the one I’m on.

The may be the last update for a bit of time…. Apparently there is no wi-fi at camp. If I’m able to get an EDGE connection on my phone, I might be able to make some text only posts and then post all the pictures when I get back to Frankfurt next week. Although I did just try my 3G phone (which I’d use for the connection) and it was actually able to call up a web page in high-speed – but at $15 per MB (mega-byte – think 250-500kb per web page – surf judiciously!) as opposed to $1.29 per minute to actually talk to someone.

And to get ready for the journey to the woods – must get everything charged up…one universal adapter, one 60’s style three way adapter (lets the ground plug slide over the side of it), laptop, camera battery and video camera charging… guess I’d better charge the phone!

See you when I see you.

[? ? ?]

4 Comments »

4 Responses to “Frankfurt To Berlin”

  1. Eric Gowins Says:

    I think those statues represent night and day (or possibly they’re just really good friends. “The appearance of the station is divided into perron (track hall) and vestibule (reception hall). Dominant in those parts built in 1888 are neorenaissance features, the outer two halls, added in 1924 follow the style of neoclassicism. The eastern façade of the vestibule features a large clock with two symbolic statues for day and night. Above the clock, the word Hauptbahnhof and the Deutsche Bahn logo are situated.

    The roof of the front hall carries a monumental statue of Atlas supporting the World on his shoulder, in this case assisted by two allegorical figures representing Iron and Steam.”

    Any of that work for you?

    Why are you going to camp? What’s up with that?

  2. Swanda Says:

    Oh my the boy with his toys! Too mucking futch! Oh and wait until you see what I treated myself too!

  3. Swanda Says:

    Posted the picture of the boys on my blog by the way and gave you credit.

  4. Chip & Linda Says:

    Just got back from Sonoma, getting caught up on my reading. Can’t say for sure, but here’s a possibility from Wikipedia (depends on how close the guys are to the clock on the east end):

    The appearance of the station is divided into perron (track hall) and vestibule (reception hall). Dominant in those parts built in 1888 are neorenaissance features, the outer two halls, added in 1924 follow the style of neoclassicism. The eastern façade of the vestibule features a large clock with two symbolic statues for day and night. Above the clock, the word Hauptbahnhof and the Deutsche Bahn logo are situated.

    The roof of the front hall carries a monumental statue of Atlas supporting the World on his shoulder, in this case assisted by two allegorical figures representing Iron and Steam.